Authors and artists of the Handbook of the Mammals of the World - Volume 3

Chief Editors

Dr Russell A. Mittermeier: President, Conservation International; Vice-President, International Union for Conservation of Nature (IUCN); and Chair, IUCN/SSC Primate Specialist Group, USA.

Professor Anthony B. Rylands: Senior Research Scientist, Conservation International, Arlington, Virginia, USA; and Deputy Chair, IUCN/SSC Primate Specialist Group.

Dr Don E. Wilson: Chairman, Department of Vertebrate Zoology, National Museum of Natural History, Smithsonian Institution, Washington, DC, USA; and Co-chair, IUCN/SSC Small Mammal Specialist Group.

 

Authors

Martina V. Anandam: Researcher, Wildlife Information Liaison Development, Coimbatore, Tamil Nadu, India.

Dr Elizabeth L. Bennett: Vice-President, Species Conservation, Wildlife Conservation Society, New York, New York, USA; and member of the IUCN/SSC Primate Specialist Group.

Dr Bruna M. Bezerra: Research Fellow, Departamento de Zoologia, Universidade Federal de Pernambuco, Recife, Pernambuco, Brazil; and member of the IUCN/SSC Primate Specialist Group.

Dr David J. Chivers: Reader Emeritus in Primate Biology and Conservation, University of Cambridge, Cambridge, UK; Fellow and Tutor, Selwyn College, Cambridge, UK; and member of the IUCN/SSC Primate Specialist Group.

Margaret K. Corley: Department of Anthropology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA.

Fanny M. Cornejo: Research Program, Yunkawasi, Lima, Peru; and member of the IUCN/SSC Primate Specialist Group.

Dr Tim R. B. Davenport: Country Director – Tanzania, Wildlife Conservation Society, Mbeya, Tanzania; and member of the IUCN/SSC Primate Specialist Group.

Nicola J. Davies: Higher Education and Research Officer, Bristol Conservation and Science Foundation, c/o Bristol Zoo Gardens, Bristol, UK.

Dr Thomas R. Defler: Associate Professor, Departamento de Biología, Universidad Nacional de Colombia, Leticia, Colombia; and member of the IUCN/SSC Primate Specialist Group.

Dr Kate M. Detwiler: Department of Anthropology, New York University, New York, New York, USA.

Dr Antje Engelhardt: Working Group Leader, Research Group on Primate Sexual Selection, Reproductive Biology Unit, German Primate Center and Courant Research Center “Evolution of Social Behaviour,” University of Göttingen, Göttingen, Germany.

Dr Ardith A. Eudey: Biological Anthropologist, Upland, California, USA; and member of the IUCN/SSC Primate Specialist Group.

Dr Eduardo Fernandez-Duque: Associate Professor and Director, Owl Monkey Project, Department of Anthropology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA; Adjunct Researcher, CONICET, Argentina; and member of the IUCN/SSC Primate Specialist Group.

Dr Stephen F. Ferrari: Adjunct Professor, Departamento de Ecologia, Universidade Federal de Sergipe, Aracaju, Sergipe, Brazil; CNPq Research Fellow; and member of the IUCN/SSC Primate Specialist Group.

Gisela H. Fickenscher: Research Scientist, Cognitive Ethology Laboratory, German Primate Center, Göttingen, Germany.

Dr Barbara I. Fruth: Senior Research Fellow, Department of Primatology, Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Anthropology, Leipzig, Germany; and member of the IUCN/SSC Primate Specialist Group.

Dr Elizabeth L. Gadsby: Pandrillus Foundation, Portland, Oregon, USA; and member of the IUCN/SSC Primate Specialist Group.

Dr Kenneth E. Glander: Professor, Department of Evolutionary Anthropology, Duke University, Durham, North Carolina, USA; and member of the IUCN/SSC Primate Specialist Group.

Professor Colin P. Groves: Professor of Biological Anthropology, School of Archaeology and Anthropology, Australian National University, Canberra, ACT, Australia; also, member of the following IUCN/SSC groups: African Rhino, Antelope, Asian Rhino, Asian Wild Cattle, Deer, Equid, Hippo, Peccary, Primate, Small Carnivore, and Wild Pig.

Professor S. Gursky-Doyen: Department of Anthropology, Texas A&M University, College Station, Texas, USA; and member of the IUCN/SSC Primate Specialist Group.

Aoife Healy: Faculty of Humanities and Social Sciences, Department of Social Sciences, Oxford Brookes University, Oxford, UK.
 

Artist

Stephen D. Nash

Born in Clacton-on-Sea, Essex, England in 1954, Stephen Nash attended the Colchester School of Art, Middlesex University, and the Royal College of Art, and since 1982 has worked for Dr. Russell Mittermeier, Chair of the IUCN/SSC Primate Specialist Group and President of Conservation International, and Dr. Anthony Rylands, Deputy Chair of the PSG,  producing images for numerous books, scientific articles, and conservation education materials.
Initially intent upon pursuing a career in medical illustration, his life changed when he encountered Callitrichid monkeys for the first time at London Zoo, and he became determined to find out as much as he could about them. (Years later, he was to find that a long-forgotten childhood toy which strongly resembled a tamarin may well have subconsciously influenced him.) His interest in primates developed quickly, along with an ambition to illustrate every taxon. This undertaking was informed with more significance by his research into his own ancestry, which continues.

In a 2008 article in the Journal of Threatened Taxa he wrote: “As I have delved deeper and deeper in time, moving away from the recent, outermost leaf tips of my family tree towards the comparatively ancient trunk, it has become ever more obvious how closely related all of humanity really is. So it is that it has been really quite easy to take the next step and acknowledge, not just intellectually but viscerally, our close relationship with our zoological ‘cousins’, the primates. Beyond even this realization comes the acceptance of our membership of a global family that includes all life on the planet. This is not a new concept, of course, and it has been part of many philosophies and religions for centuries before recent scientific breakthroughs, especially in the field of genetics, have given it scientific weight. My work has become for me a celebration of this personal acknowledgement of these wider connections.”

In 2002, a species of Titi Monkey, Callicebus stephennashi, was named in his honor; in 2004, the American Society of Primatologists granted him its President’s Award in recognition of his “significant contributions to primate taxonomy, to primate conservation, and to public education about primates and their habitats”; and in 2008 he received the Primate Society of Great Britain Medal for Special Contributions to Primatology.
 
He is based at Stony Brook University on Long Island, New York, USA, in the Department of Anatomical Sciences.